Happy Homemaker, Ph.D.

A novice homemaker's attempts to use her engineering Ph.D. to serve her family

What’s a STEM Woman (At Home) to Do? – Part 1

Women are encouraged like never before to enter the fields of science, technology, engineering, and math (STEM), but is the message balanced?

(Image source)

A reader comment to my post on What I Missed In College got me to thinking about the push to encourage girls to explore and enter STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering, Mathematics) fields.  This hit me even harder as I recently learned a five-year-old girl that I dearly love is headed to a STEM magnet school for kindergarten next year.

Don’t get me wrong.  I LOVE the STEM fields!  LOVE THEM!  I have studied them with excitement and vigor since at least 1991 and spent a combined ten years working as an engineer and teaching operations management (using math and problem solving in business applications).  I even found I loved applied statistics so much that I left my well-paying job and amazing friends to move to the desert to study for a Ph.D.!  So, why do I feel hesitation in embracing these programs for women?

I feel the message may be unbalanced.

That little five-year-old girl has been described most to me as a “little mother.”  She plays well with my oldest girl, but she adores and nurtures my youngest.  I think she’ll be beyond excited to hold my newest baby sometime this summer.  I can’t help but wonder if, in the midst of building projects with moving parts, getting excited about math, and performing hands-on experiments, she’ll also learn to ignore that part of her heart that loves to care for little children.  Will she, in a male-dominated field, lose her quiet, tender heart in an effort to achieve “success?”

Perhaps it’s my own story that gives me reservations for these girls.  There is no doubt in my mind that God has given me my interest in and aptitude for science, engineering, and statistics.  I cannot imagine pursuing a major other than Chemical Engineering as an undergrad even now, knowing I’d choose to switch to industrial engineering as a major in grad school, teach in a business college, and then stay home with my children.  I fully enjoyed, as a woman, being in the minority of the development engineering department I worked in.   I was able to support myself in the years before I was married.

During those years, I still had my focus that I had insisted on in college – that I wanted a job, not a career.  And I dreamed of being a stay-at-home mom, like my mom was, more than anything else.  Then, I went back to school full-time for my Ph.D., a path that I could not see ever going together with a family.  A year later, I married.

I’d love to say that marriage kept my aspirations grounded.  I now got to care for my husband, cooking meals, trying to keep house, and all of the domestic duties that I had mostly shoved aside for 29 years to make time for other pursuits.  Still, with being in a focused academic environment, I lost my vision.  I got distracted as I learned what I “should” be doing to be “successful” in the field of academia.  I learned what it took to be a tenure-track professor, and I learned how to do those things well.  Instead of just going through my classes and requirements, I sought out additional opportunities to gain experience in teaching, research, and service.  I started writing small grant proposals, presented my research at conferences, traveled to research meetings, gave several lectures to undergraduate students, and helped plan a research symposium on my campus.  I won awards for presentations.  I received the grant money.  I worked an intense internship and won the respect of my colleagues.  Before I graduated, I secured a teaching job at my alma mater, a dream come true for me.

Again, with “only” teaching required in this new position, I strove to keep the research and service parts of my vita full.  These efforts took away time and focus from my husband while providing additional stress as the teaching responsibilities were already more than I would consider “full-time” work.

By the time we discovered we were expecting our first child, I had been sucked in, and felt I couldn’t leave.  (Now, part of that was the calling to complete my dissertation work so I’d have my Ph.D., and I needed to stay with the university until that was complete.  That delay was my fault and a topic for another day.)  I was used to the income, the affirmation (Really?  Do I remember the days I’d read my TEVALs and cry?), the classroom, my own office on campus, and more.  I stayed a semester longer than I had to so I could try to teach a new course, an elective.    Looking back, it was probably an excuse.  I justified it many ways, and much of that last semester, I frantically searched for ways I could still remain engaged in the workforce or field part-time to keep my “foot in the door.”  I felt I needed an outlet for my well-developed skills.

And, then I came home to be that stay-at-home mom I had always dreamed of being.

In all my days of academic training, I don’t remember hearing anyone talk of how fulfilling that would be, save my mentor from my teaching internship during my doctoral program.  (I praise God for Linda!  I chose her for this reason.  I was trying to look for a family-friendly path.)

I can’t help but wonder, if I got distracted from what was really important – and what I really wanted – in a period of 5 years of academic immersion at ages 29-34, what will it be like for girls who are encouraged to enter STEM fields from much earlier ages?  Will their teachers also tell them how wonderful it will be to stay home and raise a family, should they be so blessed?

In my eighteen months at home, I haven’t missed being in the workforce.  I haven’t felt isolated.  I haven’t felt “unfulfilled” or unappreciated.  I have been full of the joy I hadn’t felt since before I started my Ph.D. studies!  I have treasured the moments with my young children.  I have savored the opportunities to pursue interests like cooking and writing that I didn’t have time for while working.  I have basked in the peace that comes from not having piles of papers to grade or the stress of hurrying between work and home, dropping a child off at day care, picking her up, and trying to fix a quick supper.  I have delighted in the pride my husband feels as I stay home to make our family a priority.  I’ve even enjoyed being on a smaller budget, being able to trust God in new ways again and seeing His faithfulness and provision.  I can’t imagine anything better than being right where I’m at, and I still get to engage in those STEM fields I love every day (see Part 2)!

So, for the girls and women out there with a passion for math or an excitement for science, I’m cheering for you, sisters!  But I’m also asking you to search your hearts and seek the Lord for what He has for you each season of your life.

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Being on the Flip Side of the Research – A Ph.D.’s Perspective as a Study Participant

Last month, instead of wheeling the stroller through my favorite engineering building to see this year’s Engineering Open House displays, we went as a family to some other parts of our local university for All-University Open House.  (This event is something I’ve delighted in since I was in high school and first came to explore the campus and programs with my family.  I usually make it a priority to at least see some of the engineering displays each April.)  Instead of my two-year-old being able to create a test tube of layered, colored liquids and be involved in the manufacture of a customized brownie (from the Chemical Engineering and Industrial Engineering departments last year, respectively), we began our adventure in the building that houses Human Ecology programs.  Little Clara seemed more intrigued by the playroom set up for Early Childhood Education, the inflatable vessel that whirled money around her (being used for some kind of time-value of money presentation), the balloons and train outside as we walked nearer to the College of Education, the sidewalk chalk near the Art department, the gardens and insect zoo, and the snacks she got as we learned how cattle feed is mixed in the College of Agriculture.  It was fun to take in the event as more of a family activity rather than me just getting a bit of an engineering fix.

While we were in the Human Ecology building, though, a woman, seeing my husband and I with our little ones, handed me a slip of paper calling for research participants in a study.  I fit the criteria.  With an incentive of a $50 gift card for attending an hour-long class and cooking two kid-friendly meals, I was interested.  I signed up.

I attended the class this week, and, as a researcher myself, I left with more questions than I came with.  Granted, this is a field (dietetics) that I’m not overly familiar with in terms of what kind of research is funded and published.  The hour-long class probably took 30 minutes, involved a last-minute location change, and included two handouts for recipe resources.  Copies of the slide presentation were not supplied.  The facilitator read from her notes, adding personal stories from time to time.  I wasn’t impressed by this, but it wasn’t too surprising either, as I figured the methodology of the study must require a certain text/presentation be given to all participants.  Our class was around 12 people, while they are hoping to find 120 participants.  The content focused on the benefits of eating vegetables, with information about different types of vegetables and ideas on how to make them more appealing to children.

A calendar was being passed around as I arrived (a couple of minutes late), and I learned that we were to cook the two meals alone in a condo near campus, rather than in our own homes.  I had pictured cooking at home and answering a survey about the cooking experience as well as how well it was received by my little ones.  Cooking off-site was not mentioned in the previous communications I’d had (info sheet, phone call, e-mail reminder).  Other moms asked if we got to taste the food we’d be preparing.  The answer was no.  Another surprise.  “So, is this just to see how easy the recipes are to prepare?” another participant asked.  “Yes.”  Very vague.  I asked about the funding source.  The FDA is funding this study that only includes our university.

I fully expect there to be hidden cameras set up in the condo, similar to the rooms set up to record how teams worked or how sales presentations were given in some of my previous universities.  I’m not sure if the lack of information is intentional (some studies need participants to be a little “in the dark” to avoid bias) or if it is just poor implementation.  Hearing the experiences and questions from the other participants, I think they may already have a biased sample of sorts.  (These moms sounded MUCH more conscientious about buying and preparing vegetables than I ever have been!)  Also, the connection between the class (focused on vegetables) and the recipes (something with fruit and a meatball recipe) seem unrelated.

So now, instead of just being interested in learning something new and acquiring a gift card, I’m a little more interested in reading the grant proposal, checking what kind of Institutional Review Board (IRB) approval was needed, knowing what kind of methodology will be used in the analysis, and reading the final results.    I don’t have time to investigate that on my own, but I think I’ll be asking more questions when I go to cook next week.

And, I’ll be looking for those hidden cameras.

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Experiment of the Week: Exploring Photography – A Two-Year-Old’s View

Granite Reflections

Granite Reflections

I know I am a bit of a control freak.  I’m trying to be more relaxed about things – from stains on well-worn garments to controlling the bite size of my 14-month-old’s food – but I still have a long way to go.  Perhaps I can blame my over-protectiveness on my training in mistake-proofing (poka-yoke)?  (This, by the way, has translated nicely into pretty good child-proofing and defect prevention at home.)  My over-active brain tends to think of all the imaginable things that could possibly go wrong, the probability of such events, and the costs or benefits of the decision.

For example, when my almost-three-year-old asks to take the camera, I start thinking of what could happen that would disable the camera.  I think about the pictures stored on it and their value to me.  I think about the costs we’d incur if we would need to purchase a new camera.  Before this week, I would let her hold the camera some, but I hadn’t taught her how to take pictures.  (I didn’t want her to start pushing other buttons…)

Monday, while we were at a small cemetery where my husband’s grandparents, great aunts and uncles, great-grandparents, and great-great grandparents are buried, she asked to take some pictures.  We weren’t on a tight schedule, and she was delighted when I agreed and showed her how to capture an image.  She had a wonderful time, running here and there, pointing our simple camera at flower after flower.  I was amazed when I downloaded the pictures and looked at some of her photographs.  All of the photos in this post were taken by Clara.  Some of them are very special to me.

Besides the one at the top of the post, here are some of my favorites:

My first belly shot of the pregnancy! (Seven weeks to go.)

My first belly shot of the pregnancy! (Seven weeks to go.)  (I’m not intentionally hiding behind the directory.  I had no idea she’d take my picture.)

I followed my little girl around, enjoying her glee as she clicked away.  It gave me a chance to look at the stones and wonder about the lives they represented.  Clara took a few pictures of the flowers near the stone below.  “Beloved Teacher,” the stone read at the bottom.

Remembering a beloved teacher.  This woman, from the headstone information, appeared to have no family, but she was fondly remembered still.

Remembering a beloved teacher. This woman, from the headstone information, appeared to have no family of her own, but she was fondly remembered still.

I don’t remember if it was this set of graves or ones similar to them that I slowly passed.  A teenage girl had died.  I looked again at the graves nearby.  From the birth years shown, it appeared that her grandpa and mom had also died the same day, Halloween in the early 1980s.  I wondered what tragedy took so many family members at the same time.

Shadows

Shadows

What photo collection would be complete without a shot of toes?

Flowers and Flip Flops

Flowers and Flip Flops

We needed to leave soon, but Clara had a difficult time surrendering the camera.  She took one shot of her dad.

She loves her daddy!

She loves her daddy!

Results and Conclusions:

I was amazed at Clara’s photographs.  Her perspective was special!  Really special!  It was fun to look at the images and see the world (though often out of focus) through her eyes at her near-37″ height.  Her interest in the puffed dandelion was something I had not noticed at all that afternoon.  The memorial flowers drew her in.  Even the grass was beautiful enough to try to capture and remember.

My children can do more than I think, and I need to give them more freedom to try new things and develop new skills.  Not only will this help them grow and develop more, but it also teaches me by showing me new perspectives and approaches that I would have never dreamed of myself.

Next time, she won’t have to beg so hard to use the camera.  🙂

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Correction: He Does Bring Flowers Home

I laughed as my husband returned from work Friday.  I had posted that day about how much I appreciate his hard work in our yard and gardens that supplies me with beautiful flowers throughout the summer, though it’s extremely rare that he brings cut flowers home (A Gift That Keeps On Giving).  He stepped out of his truck after the end of a long week of work and had these beautiful flowers with him!  (He had not had time to read my post yet.)

The beautiful flowers my husband brought Friday

The beautiful flowers my husband brought Friday

I was delighted!  They are so beautiful, and we are all enjoying them.  Some of the flowers are perennials that we can plant and hopefully enjoy again next year, and the others may be such that we can gather the seeds and plant them again as well.

We are all enjoying them!

We are all enjoying them!

I guess it just goes to show me that my husband is still full of wonderful surprises! He is such a blessing!

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The Gettysburg Address – Words for Us Today

“Fourscore and seven years ago our fathers brought forth on this continent a new nation, conceived in liberty and dedicated to the proposition that all men are created equal. Now we are engaged in a great civil war, testing whether that nation, or any nation so conceived and so dedicated can long endure. We are met on a great battlefield of that war. We have come to dedicate a portion of that field as a final resting place for those who here gave their lives that that nation might live. It is altogether fitting and proper that we should do this. But in a larger sense we cannot dedicate, we cannot consecrate, we cannot hallow this ground. The brave men, living and dead, who struggled here have consecrated it far above our power to add or detract. The world will little note nor long remember what we say here, but it can never forget what they did here. It is for us, the living, rather to be dedicated here to the unfinished work which they who fought here have thus far so nobly advanced. It is rather for us to be here dedicated to the great task remaining before us, that from these honored dead we take increased devotion to that cause for which they gave the last full measure of devotion; that we here highly resolve that these dead shall not have died in vain; that this nation, under God, shall have a new birth of freedom, and that the government of the people, by the people, for the people shall not perish from the earth.”

Address of President Lincoln at Gettysburg, November 19, 1863

May we remember those who have served our country and their families, especially those who have given the ultimate sacrifice.

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A Gift That Keeps On Giving

My husband is amazing!  I just wanted to take some time and a post to describe a small portion of his sweet love for me.

Some men probably bring their wives flowers more than mine does.  That’s good, because while I’d enjoy that, I’d be thinking at the back of my mind what they must have cost and how we could have likely spent that money on more useful things.  This week, and actually all spring, I’ve been delighting in what he does do to bring me beautiful flowers in a way that is so sweet and tender and that I can fully enjoy and delight in!

Last fall, he bought and planted tulips that were stunning in a new section of garden by our driveway.  He also worked hard to transplant some iris plants, and we have these flowers growing in three different places in our yard.   Most of the flowers have some shade of purple in them, my favorite!

Our purple and white iris garden.  (Go, Kansas State!)

Our purple and white iris garden. (Go, Kansas State!)

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These lavender iris are my favorite with their delicate, ruffled petals.

 There’s another thing that’s special about the iris for me.  My grandma has an iris garden at the farm that I remember weeding and enjoying.  She had such a variety of colors, and the smell of the flowers is better than the sweetest perfume.  My mom also had a large iris garden in town that was always stunning.  I remember experimenting with some of the concepts I learned in my advance biology class in high school to see if I could create some new varieties.

May 23, 2013 003

If not for my husband’s hard work, these plants would still be in the bag my mom gave to us over a year ago.  (I spend too much time trying to find the perfect plan for something so the task never really gets done.)  He worked hard to plant and transplant them as we changed landscaping ideas.  He keeps our rose bush trimmed, and now it is filling with beautiful pink blooms.  He waters the lilac bushes that produce a scent I treasure (again, perhaps due to good memories from smelling them as I passed a group of bushes on my walks to the library or other places in our small town).  He brought home and planted lilies.  He planted seeds for sunflowers (another favorite of mine), wildflowers, and a hummingbird mix.

And now, though he’s not coming home from work with a bouquet behind his back, he’ll be giving me flowers all summer long!  Does it get any better than that?

(Update:  Why, yes it does!  Tonight he came home with flowers, and over the weekend, he brought in a cut, fragrant rose for me!)

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Experiment of the Week: Toy Organization

A year or two ago, I was taken aback by my mom’s rule of only playing with one set of toys (LEGOs, doll house, etc.) at a time at my parents’ house.  Our toddler also seemed to not have any idea of what she was being asked to do as she was instructed to pick up all the toys and put them away before moving on to the next thing.  I thought the idea seemed unrealistic at the time.

A few weeks ago, I reconsidered.  Toys were everywhere in our house.  Everywhere.  While I had tried various systems for making clean-up easier for us all, none of them had really worked.  Woody’s hat was missing again.  Jessie has been MIA for weeks.  The neat dishes and piggy utensils from a special friend were strung across different rooms.   I decided something had to change.

But, I also decided to start small.  Call it a trial run or a pilot study.  🙂

I took a fabric box I got on sale at K-Mart after Christmas and simply put all the play dishes and cookware in it.  I placed that box in the living room (so Melody could access it easily, too) after picking up all the other toys that were there.  I initiated a new rule that the dishes must be returned to the box.

And for a week or so, it worked!  My two-year-old was excited about the piggy utensils again!  She was “cooking breakfast,” hosting picnics, and teaching the one-year-old how to mix.  Then, I think I slacked off on the accountability of that system.  I’m still a work in progress when it comes to keeping things clean and organized, remember?

Still, I’d seen enough success to start dreaming of going through the toys, clearing the clutter, and going to a container system much like what my mom had.  (Okay, so I should have just known that was a good idea of my mom’s.  She worked with preschoolers for years.  I have not.)

But when?

This week, my husband surprised me by stopping by the house after lunch.  He offered to take the three-year-old with him for a while.  I let him.  In the meantime, I was able to bake a batch of peanut butter cookies and get to start on the toy project.

Now, imagine for a moment, toys and books are scattered everywhere, it seems (even to me with slob vision), and I am trying to bend over to pick up said toys around a basketball-sized belly.  It was hard work for me.  I kept telling our one-year-old that we needed to take a little break from time to time.  She just looked at me, confused.  🙂

I was surprised by the success I had in just a couple of hours (maybe less?)!  I sorted the “baby” toys from the rest and boxed them up to be stored until the newest little one is ready for such entertainment.  I put the toys (even some books, gasp!) in a bag to donate to others.

What was left?

  • Barbies and clothes
  • LEGOs
  • Building blocks
  • Doctor kit
  • Dishes/cookware
  • Favorite stuffed animals
  • Dress-up dresses and costumes
  • Some miscellaneous

These fit well in the number of containers I had, and with a little work, I got the closet cleaned to provide an organized space for them.  The miscellaneous toys are a little larger, and I moved some of them to the old toy boxes that I had tried to utilize before.  One toy box was completely empty!

Our much-better way of keeping toys organized and picked up!

Our much-better way of keeping toys organized and picked up!

The results?  We’ve been relatively mess-free (toy wise, at least) throughout the house (okay, except for that bath squirt toy I stepped on three times last night) for two full days!  Clara, my almost-three-year-old seems to be having more fun as she plays.  Tonight, she even pulled out the blocks and was building towers on her own!  She hasn’t played with the blocks for a VERY long time!  And, she was the one who initiated putting them back in the box before bedtime, then back into the closet.  I think we’re on to something!

Now, if I can just get the clothes gone through and organized soon…

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The Best Kind of Surprise

There have been two main reasons I haven’t been consistent in blogging since Melody was born last spring.  One reason is I’ve been prayerfully seeking how to best spend the limited discretionary time I have, and I wasn’t convinced that blogging was the priority.  The other reason is the fatigue I’ve been feeling the last year.  First, I was busy seeing to my newborn’s needs.   The fatigue didn’t leave me when Melody started sleeping through the night, though, and those necessary early bedtimes continued.  I thought it was because I was using so many calories nursing, and it likely was.  (That, and keeping up with my 2-year-old and sweet infant.)

It was nearly Christmas last year when I became suspicious enough of the strange way I’d been feeling that I took a pregnancy test.  We soon learned that my frequent night-time trips to the bathroom, ongoing exhaustion, and strong need for mid-morning protein were impacted by the new baby growing inside me.

Hello, World! See you soon!  (Our third child at 20 weeks)

Hello, World! See you soon! (Our third child at 20 weeks)

A baby that will be, Lord-willing, joining us at home in mid-July!

(I was nearly 12 weeks along when we found out.  Let me tell you, the first trimester goes very quickly when you don’t find out until after 11 weeks have passed!)

I admit, I was a little freaked out at first.  Clara will be 3 in June.  Melody turned 1 in March.  There will be just under 16 months between Melody and this baby.  That’s a lot of little people to care for!  I was intimidated by the timing.  I was excited, but also scared.  We had hoped for more children, but didn’t think we’d be blessed again so soon.

I knew I just needed to trust God.  This baby was a gift from Him, and I knew that.  My faith was (and is) strong.  Sometimes, it just takes my mind a while to catch up.

The prayer dialog in my head goes something like this:

“Less than sixteen months apart, God?  Really?  Doesn’t Mom say she had twins ‘the hard way’ with my sister and me being just fifteen months apart?  How is this going to work?  I’m often worn out from caring for our two little ones now.  How am I going to do that–while nursing a newborn and being sleep-deprived?”

Okay, so it wasn’t much of a dialog, but after my venting of my worries, I remembered again and again God’s faithfulness to me.  He’s never called me to a task and left me all alone.  He always has my best interest in mind – even if I don’t see it until later.  He’s loved me so obviously and abundantly that I don’t doubt that His will is best.

With just eight weeks to go until we meet Baby (We don’t know if it’s a girl or a boy.  Similar to our other pregnancies, we wanted to be surprised.), I don’t know how this is going to work.  I don’t know who we’ll be able to find to watch our girls while we’re at the hospital.  I don’t know how the birth and recovery will go.  I don’t know how I’ll survive when my dear husband has to return to work, leaving me with three little ones in my charge.  I don’t know if this baby will have colic, like Clara, or be a profoundly happy baby like Melody.  I don’t even know how I’ll be able to even get everyone in and out of the car seats…

But God knows.  He has it all planned out, and I know He’ll take care of me.


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Coffee Breaks (Mocha Cooler Mix Recipe)

I grew up seeing adults drink coffee black or not at all.  One taste, and when I was “of age,” I happily became one of the not-at-all category.  I relied on Mountain Dew for the caffeine necessary for all of that late-night studying in college.

But, over the course of ten years and the encouragement of three persistent friends, I discovered that coffee can be wonderful – with good friends and enough cream and sugar.  🙂  (Thanks to Mary (V.) J. for recommending my first caramel breve at Java in 1996, Anna (L.) J., and Susanna (M.) E.!  I miss you dearly, ladies!)

I tried to explain to my students when I would discuss quality management with them that coffee for me is more of an event than a beverage.  (I was giving an example as we talked about who defines quality.  The customer does.)   For me, I like to go to a coffee shop whose atmosphere fits my mood and purpose.  (Am I meeting a friend, going to reflect and journal, retreating to a quiet place to grade papers, etc.?)  I delight (or am disappointed) in the shape and texture of the cup the drink is served in.  I associate the act of drinking coffee with many, many good memories of wonderful friends, long talks, and blessed times of solitude, primarily from my days between graduating from college and getting married.

Though my trips to the local coffee shops are very rare now, I still try to enjoy coffee as an event at home.  Even my simple Folder’s brew, served in one of my china cups, and a moment of quiet before my little ones are up is a bit of a retreat for me.

But, the weather is warming up, and, remembering fond moments of taking Friday afternoon breaks to get a blended coffee drink while I worked an internship for a semiconductor company near Phoenix, I was eager to try a new recipe I found for Mocha Cooler.

I was not disappointed!  I’ve found which glass at home will hold both servings easily (without whipped cream), and as an afternoon pick-me-up, I’m finding this is an EASY and refreshing treat.  Now I just need to convince myself I don’t need one every afternoon…

A refreshing break with flowers from my dear husband and a mocha cooler.

A refreshing break with flowers from my dear husband and a mocha cooler.

Mocha Cooler (from Taste of Home’s 2002 Quick Cooking Annual Recipes, p. 95)

Make Ahead Mix:
1/4 cup instant coffee granules
1 cup sugar
1 cup nonfat dry milk powder
1 cup powdered nondairy creamer
1/3 cup baking cocoa
1/4 teaspoon salt
 
Additional ingredients:
1-1/2 cups crushed ice
1/2 cup milk
Whipped topping, if desired

With a rolling pin, crush coffee granules into a fine powder between sheets of waxed paper.  Place in an air-tight container.  Add the sugar, milk powder, creamer, cocoa and salt; mix well.  Sore in a cool dry place for up to 1 year.  Yield:  7 batches (3-1/2 cups total).

To prepare cooler:  In a blender, combine the ice, milk, and 1/2 cup of mocha mix; cover and process on high until smooth.  Pour into glasses.  Top with whipped topping if desired.  Yield:  2 servings per batch.  (Okay, so there’s enough to share, but you may not want to.)

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Retail Therapy and God’s Provision

I’m not much of a shopper, and I tend to be somewhat overwhelmed by the high prices I see when I do browse a little.  I don’t feel I have the time to peruse stores and ads for the best deals.

Last November, I heard that a local church was having a rummage sale.  Last spring, our church had a similar event, and we were amazed and delighted at what we found there.  I had some Christmas gift ideas in mind in the fall, and I hoped I may be able to find some things that someone no longer needed that would be treasures for us.  I wanted to go as soon as they opened Friday evening.

But, that didn’t happen.

The next morning came, and I forgot about the sale until around 11.  They were closing at noon.  I rounded up the girls, knowing that it would be a challenge to take my 2-year-old who seems to say, “I want this for my birthday,” of everything fun-looking at any store.  We made it there around 11:30.

There were plenty of things left, and the prices were fantastic since in 30 minutes, all would be packed up to be donated to Goodwill.  My prize find was a pair of boots that Clara could use for the winter!  That was in the first room.  Next, there were some toys.  I found an old Fisher Price crib toy (no batteries needed) that Melody has been enjoying a lot as she explores the colorful moving parts that make a variety of sounds.  We found a Baby Mickey Mouse doll that Clara latched onto.  I found dress patterns that are sized large enough that I may be able to learn to sew and make them before the girls outgrow them.  🙂  I found a tablecloth that is easy to wipe clean and more sturdy and durable than what I had before.  The yellow color even matches my wallpaper border in the kitchen.  I found learning games that will be fun for Clara as we talk about letters and words.  There was a set (missing “E”) of alphabet magnets.  We got an old flip-top desk with the chair attached, that I think will be perfect for Clara’s learning and “art projects.”  We even found a Disney princess purse that she was super-excited about, another simple baby toy for Melody, a picture frame that will be perfect as a gift for someone this Christmas, and more.  We got some things we needed, many “added bonuses,” and probably some things that I shouldn’t have brought home (but will be easier to part with when we clean out and donate to the church sale in the spring).

All for $7.75.

Less than what I would have spent on even on-sale boots at a store.

I was giddy!

We were blessed with similar luck as we went to a few other neighborhood and church yard sales over the last two weeks. We now have a “new” couch and chair in our living room, increasing our seating capacity and comfort considerably and making the family room downstairs more cozy as we moved the love seat back down there.  Just as I was starting to worry about having summer clothes for Clara, we now have more than we need in her size, including shoes.  I even found a princess dress and a crown for her upcoming birthday.

I’m ever-amazed by God’s great provision for us!  I love how these sales meet our needs, keep our spending low, simplify our shopping, and make me feel so blessed as I see how God knows our needs and takes care of us – down to the special things like a princess crown or a microscope (I’ve always wanted one!).

I may not have found a costume crown in my size at the church yard sale, but I definitely feel like the daughter of the King!  We truly can cast all our cares upon Him and trust Him to supply us as we seek Him first.

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